6 Compelling Deviations CLNC® Consultants Should Assess in Medical Malpractice Legal Nurse Consultant Jobs

6 Compelling Deviations CLNC® Consultants Should Assess in Medical Malpractice Legal Nurse Consultant Jobs

If you’re a Certified Legal Nurse Consultant who consults on medical malpractice legal nurse consultant jobs for plaintiff attorneys, it’s important to go beyond what happened at the bedside. A case is much more compelling when you take it up the hierarchal scale by examining the healthcare facility’s responsibility to the patient. Don’t just focus on the over-worked, underpaid, stressed RN caring for the patient.

It’s essential to consider these six deviations in every medical malpractice legal nurse consultant job:

  1. Negligent short staffing.
  2. Inappropriate delegation of a provider not qualified to treat the patient.
  3. Failure to have an appropriate policy and procedure in place.
  4. Inadequate supervision of staff.
  5. Failure to respond to an RN’s communication regarding a deteriorating patient.
  6. Negligent credentialing of an MD.

It’s not always the registered nurse at the bedside who has impacted outcome, and taking the case up the hierarchal scale makes the case more interesting and more compelling to a jury. While you never want to ignore what happened at the bedside, it pays to focus on the inner workings of the healthcare facility and how that facility has adversely impacted patient outcome on every legal nurse consultant job.

Success Is Yours!

P.S. Comment and share how you’ve applied compelling deviations to medical malpractice cases as a Certified Legal Nurse Consultant.

3 thoughts on “6 Compelling Deviations CLNC® Consultants Should Assess in Medical Malpractice Legal Nurse Consultant Jobs

  1. Having been short staffed and overloaded myself (and which nurse hasn’t had that happen?) more times than I care to remember, I would second the “negligent short staffing” check. When the staff has worked all day without a single break in 14 1/2 hours, and the boss has never shown their face (or bothered to send anyone else either to check in, nor have they called!), just whose fault is it that bad things happen?

    1. So very true, and unfortunately happening now more then ever. I have been a nurse 34 years and new regulations are being ignored too often. Sounds a bit harsh but often no one is held accountable but the bedside nurse. The old saying, “Tag you’re it”.

  2. Thanks, Vickie! Negligent credentialing of an MD… that issue never occurred to me. I’ll chalk that up as one to look for too.

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*The opinions and statements made by Vickie Milazzo, the founder of Medical-Legal Consulting Institute, Inc. are based on her experiences and expertise, should not be applied beyond the specific context provided, and do not guaranty or project actual results. Vickie Milazzo is no longer involved in the operations or management of the business, but is involved as an independent education consultant.

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